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Username Post: Derek Sanderson
the hammer
superstar
Posts 3633
05-19-03 09:59 PM - Post#106437    

I'm sure all you guys remember Derek as the worst homer broardcaster of all time. No Bruin ever lost a fight or deserved any penalty that they got. I HATED him as a broadcaster but loved him as a hockey player! Sanderson was the first "flake" to play the game. He patterned his way of life after Joe Namath's, the long hair, the girls, the nightlife, even part ownship of Bachelor's III resturant. In Boston he was as popular as Bobby Orr. In the early 70's in Boston over 10,000 woman entered a Date With Derek contest. "Derek Is Unreal" t-shirts were the rage here in beantown. He was the first player in the NHL to wear long hair and the first to wear a mustache. What you may not know was that even though he weighted only 175 pounds, he was one of the best fighters in hockey from 1967 to 1972. He fought Orland Kurtenbach to a draw and Kurtenbach along with John Ferguson were considered the best fighters in the league at the time. I remember hearing that he beat Ferguson in 1969. He was hated in every city, as much as people hated Dave Schultz outside of Philadelphia. He jumped to the WHA at the start of the 1972-73 season but had a terrible year as the money went to his head. He even stopped fighting. He return to Boston in 1973-74 and got into a clubhouse fight with Terry O'Reilly. The story i heard was that he kicked O'Reilly's ass and gave him a black eye. It was hushed up at the time but the story leaked out in later years. Derek was traded to the Rangers at the end of the 1974 season. By then he was washed up as a player and a fighter. Anybody remember the rubber chicken that was thrown at him in St. Louis?
espo
captain
Posts 996
05-19-03 10:42 PM - Post#106443    

Excellent post! Nobody but a few of us understand what a character he was....most just know him as Derek the Homer".

You got no idea!

Too bad because many missed out on one of the coolest cats in all sports. In fact, I just bought an old life magazine off of abebooks.com with a 10 page spread on him. That's how big he was at the time.

You covered his fighting ability but did not mention his defensive skills which were some of the best ever. The guy could win face-offs at will and he practically invented the sweep check killing penalties!

Rookie of the year for his defensive and offensive skills and I really believe he was the heart and soul of those Bruins back then. His brawls and going after Giacomin...the Ranger revenge mugging...throwing jerseys into the stands after beating a guy....white shoes....long hair. Te guy walked the walk and lived 10 lives in a short time before the burn out.

When he dried out he was still the man to me and could really dish it out and still take it (see Barclay's Sunday punch) but his time had passed and he seemed more a novelty and players weren't letting him lead anymore.

I've got stories beyond the stories....

As a blue, he really played decent, but no one wanted to watch defensive players. I have a great film of him as a Blue v. Kings where he sweeped the puck while short-handed and went in and scored.
goldthorpe
hall of famer
Posts 9684
goldthorpe
05-20-03 06:17 AM - Post#106460    

I love the picture of him as a Philadelphia Blazer(WHA) where he's doing a double leg stop facing the camera for a yearbook shot and he's got a cigarette dangling from his mouth. Classic!
“O'Henry? That's one of the top-selling candy bars. It's got chocolate, peanuts, nougat, it's delicious, scrumptious, outstanding!" - Jackie Chiles


Butcher99
hall of famer
Posts 6504
Butcher99
05-20-03 08:06 AM - Post#106468    

Thanks Hammer

First and foremost, the information on the Fergie fight. I thought Fergie lost only one, actually a draw, to Kurtenbach. The fight of the century from what I heard and saw on this board. Karen I think talked about it. Any written materials on that one.

Next, now I don't know if anyone here watched Joe Namath's rather short lived weekly television show in the early 70's. He had Sanderson on several times. The bell bottom pants and mirage silky shirts, and of course smoking the cig on live television. Loved it. Those guys were so damm real back then. Not these purified, PC, steroid ridden, Atkins' Diet boys.

And the babes in the audience for Joe Willie and Sanderson. They spent plenty a night out on the town. Now how would you have liked to be out watching those two guys on a night out in the early 70's in New York or Beantown ? How many times can a man get laid by beautiful women. They say Namath had one question only when he first met a beautiful girl (this from ESPN classic): "Are you engaged or married". If not, she was his. Sanderson on the other hand, did not give a shit. Anything he wanted was his, married or not.

Again, great post from a great era.

Hike
Veteran
Posts 6090
05-20-03 08:25 AM - Post#106469    

The guy was a tenacious player who made it a habit of crashing the net. Pretty good fighter for that era, late 60's early 70's. Took on Kurtenbach at least twice. From memory, he lost the first one in Boston where Kurtenbach bloodied him, and got a draw with Kurtenbach in New York. Also put a hurting on Vic Hadfield. I believe that Hadfield had bad-mouthed Sanderson for any earlier win he had over Vic and vowed revenge. Didn't get it as Sanderson beat him again.

He destroyed the Rangers in the 72 playoffs. He bragged to the press how he was going to run Giacomin at every opportunity, and he proceeded to do just that. He beat up on Bobby Rousseau, Rod Gilbert, and Vic Hadfield in that series and the Rangers had no answer.

He was also involved in one of the wildest bench clearers ever, Bruins-Canadians in the early 70's. This is the one where Cashman goes mental, Sanderson winds up on the Montreal bench, and the Boston cops and fans get involved with the Canadians as well. Sanderson ends up fighting some Canadian in the stands.

Most posters here probably only remember him as the burnt-out homer announcer for the Bruins, but in his day, the guy laid it on the line game in and game out, and and was a special player. Maybe one of the greatest face-off men and penalty killers the game has seen.
When you have bacon and eggs for breakfast, the chicken makes a contribution, but the pig makes a committment

Butcher99
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Posts 6504
Butcher99
05-20-03 08:52 AM - Post#106472    

Hike

I keep hearing from the old timers about how tough Vic Hadfield was, yet every time he gets his ass kicked. This time by Sanderson. Didn't Ted Green also have something to say about that. He was not that big, and I always thought of him more as an offensive player--the GAG line.

And in that Montreal/Bruin brawl, is that the one where they show Lupien having his chance to fight Sanderson, but he backed off from going with Dereck. ?

espo
captain
Posts 996
05-20-03 09:28 AM - Post#106473    

There's a famous picture from that Montreal brawl with Sanderson wearing a policeman's hat he took off a cop.

I've told this story before, but it's worth repeating: Sanderson was one of the only players I ever saw who would constantly interact and talk with the fans. I clearly remember him during a game at the Forum when my friends were yelling at him between shifts and he paused and pointed at one who had just said someting about his mother or something. That guy shut up because he got the distinct feeling Sanderson would come after him.

Another time, there was an interview in MSG where the Turk had to literally fight his way to the booth. The announcer was announcing the hassalling on the walk up the stairs and you could hear the commotion. Finally, he got to the booth and started sneering at the fans...callng them 'animals'.

Butcher99: Hike may know for sure, but I think I heard that Hadfield also had shoulder problems. He was a willing punching bag as his career went on, but I have a few tapes of his younger days when he fought extremely well. LOoked like a world-beater. Once, he fought 3 different guys in the same brawl.

daveh8
superstar
Posts 4008
05-20-03 09:47 AM - Post#106475    

don't know a lot about the incident, but he also led the bruins into the stands in philly from his seat in the penalty box to go after a heckling fan....for some reason, this incident doesn't get talked about much....
Hike
Veteran
Posts 6090
05-20-03 10:20 AM - Post#106479    

Can't swear to it Espo, but I think Hadfield injured his shoulder in that 72 playoff series against the Bruins, so I don't think that really affected his abilities as a fighter as his career was already winding down by that time.

I never really considered Hadfield a heavyweight, just a good, tough player who would drop the mitts when necessary. Back in the early/mid 60's, he was considered one of the better fighters, but there weren't a whole lot of fighters in the league at that time. The only real "fighters" and the cream of the crop were probably Kurtenbach and Ferguson. The rest of the pack consisted of guys like Green, Fleming, Harris, Baun, Neilson, Hadfield, etc..

By the time the late 60's/early 70's rolled around, Ferguson had stepped down and the other holdovers from the early/mid 60's were no longer the fighting forces they once were. The new wave started in the later 60's with guys like Sanderson and Cashman and eventually progressed to Maloney, Nystrom, Kelly, Schultz, O'Reilly, and the list just grows from there.

When you have bacon and eggs for breakfast, the chicken makes a contribution, but the pig makes a committment

Tommy_The_Bull
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Posts 3459
Tommy_The_Bull
05-20-03 10:43 AM - Post#106484    

Sanderson was my favorite player when he did his best work for the B's -- he was not that big but closer to average size for that era. He was a complete player who could have made the hall if he'd reached his potential. He was fearless and very smart most of the time on the ice. He was another colorful player who helped "sell" hockey in his day. I still have a poster of him in the attic that he signed for me after a game he played during his short stay in Detroit. Yes, I hated his color work, but glad he got his life back after falling so low. The Turk and Joe Willie hunting women together...
Neely8
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Posts 6299
Neely8
05-20-03 11:09 AM - Post#106495    

I think in terms of his hockey career there's two Derek Sandersons...the player and the WSBK-TV announcer. Sanderson was as passionate about being a color commentator as he was being a professional hockey player. He attacked both jobs with reckless abandon and was wildly successful at both. Sanderson was a world class agitator, maybe the finest agitator the sport has ever seen.

The stories and folklore of him are legendary....from the brawls to the babes to the infamous photoshoot in Playgirl to the million dollar bonus...on and on.

My neighbor had a little run in with him in 1970...the two nearly came to blows over a woman at a local spot up here...Sanderson backed down when push came to shove...or, several Bruins coaxed the drunk Sanderson to calm down and leave before someone got hurt.

Then there was the time at the height of my delinquent youth when Sanderson stood before me almost like an angel, preaching to us troubled youth about right and wrong and the choices we make. Still to this day I attribute his words as a saving point at a critical time in my own life when I had some dificult descisions to make. He'd speak at various high schools about drugs, alchohol and being a general hoodlum. We sat and clinged to every word the guy said...

HIKE - What was the story on the Sanderson-Bob Neely episode? Was that a 1972 playoff game where the Rangers went nutty and attacked Sanderson...led by Neely?

Good stuff guys...always good to read about ole Dereck...I didn't know he beat Ferguson until today...damn good read.


Axelinger
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Posts 5144
Axelinger
05-20-03 11:21 AM - Post#106497    

Couldn't have been Bob Neely -- he was never a Ranger, and not even in the league until the Leafs drafted him in '73...
McPhee21
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Posts 398
05-20-03 11:37 AM - Post#106501    

It may have been Arnie Brown leading the attack against Sanderson.
Cheech
Member
Posts 12675
Cheech
05-20-03 11:53 AM - Post#106504    

Didn't the "Hawk" Harrelson also hang out with Broadway Joe and Derek?
THOSE WHO STAY WILL BE CHAMPIONS...



Boulton
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Posts 3000
05-20-03 11:55 AM - Post#106505    

We know it wasn't Rusty Staub!!!
"Go fuck yourself, Mr. Cheney! Go fuck yourself, you asshole!" Emergency Room Physican Dr. Ben Marble

Hike
Veteran
Posts 6090
05-20-03 12:46 PM - Post#106514    

Neely, that might have been the 1970 playoffs. That was the year that Sanderson fought Kurtenbach to a draw in the playoffs. For morale purposes, that was a good showing by Sanderson. He had called the Rangers chickens before that series and fans showed up in the Garden with rubber chickens and threw them at Sanderson as soon as he stepped on the ice. He was a target for his outspokeness and it was Kurtenbach's role to shut him up. Sanderson stood up to Kurtenbach and got a draw out of it. That series ended with the Bruins needing protection to get out of the Garden. They had to call the motorcycle police to give the Bruins an escort to get out of the building. When they left the fans belted their bus with bottles and rocks.

Harry Sinden tells the story that when the Bruins got safely out of range he decided to thank the police for their help. Supposedly, he told the driver to pull over and he grabbed a couple of six-packs of beer to give them. When he got off the bus he found that New Yorks finest weren't too friendly either.

Reports have it the cops told Sinden where he could shove the beer, and when the bus pulled away, headed again for the airport, several of the men on bikes joined in the one-finger salute.

Going back into the late 1960s there was another bad night that was set up by a story quoting Ranger owner William Jennings as saying he would give any of his players a bounty for getting Teddy Green, the Boston badman at the time. No one collected. In fact, Arnie Brown took two beatings for his efforts, but it was another night that the Bruins needed police escort out of town.
When you have bacon and eggs for breakfast, the chicken makes a contribution, but the pig makes a committment

espo
captain
Posts 996
05-20-03 04:05 PM - Post#106554    

There's a good story in his book about when he played in Juniors and he was trying to impress the scouts he knew were in the stands to watch some other player. In a scrum, he circled up next to the other teams toughest guy and knocked him cold with a sucker punch. He says that's what got him drafted by Boston, not his skills.

I wonder about Turk beating Fergie? Is that for sure or just a guy telling a guy who told a guy? The reason I say this is that in both Sanderson's books, he talked about Fergie with great reverence and actually gave him credit for fucking him up in a dirty way and rendering him physically worthless playoffs. Fergie later said he did it on purpose because Sanderson was the balls of that team. Derek also talked as though Green was the only guy who had a chance against Fergie, as though he was unbeatable. Neither ever mentions a loss to Sanderson in their books or other stories. Derek said the Canadians were nothing if it wasn't for Ferguson. They obviously had a lot of respect for each other.

There's some great tape of a Sanderson interview as a rookie before he became a celebrity. He looked like a choir boy and then there's another with a taped interview celebrating after the Cup win in the locker room where you see the real Sanderson coming out.

They broke the mold after that guy.
Hike
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Posts 6090
05-20-03 06:39 PM - Post#106575    

We should all raise a glass and celebrate the day that Ferguson came into the league. He alone was responsible for proving the worth of hiring full time enforcers to protect the skill players from being intimidated.

The very first game Ferguson played in was against the Bruins. 12 seconds after the faceoff he immediately goes after Ted Green, who was one of the more nastier players of that time. They had a nice fight with Ferguson busting him up pretty good. He sent the message early. He was brought there to keep other teams honest and to police the ice.

Ferguson wasn't unbeatable, and he lost a few. I don't recall that loss to Sanderson, but certainly it's possible. I had also heard he lost one to Reggie Fleming, but again, never saw it. I saw Ferguson and Fleming fight a few times and they were most always dominated by Ferguson, but with those two guys, they probably fought dozens of times. I saw Kurtenbach beat him, but I also saw him beat Kurtenbach. Most know about that "loss" to Nolet, but what's forgotten is that Clarke was holding Ferguson while Nolet was nailing him. Ferguson eventually got loose and bloodied Nolet too.

Worst loss for Ferguson was probably a one-sided beating he took from Noel Picard in a 67 bench clearer.
When you have bacon and eggs for breakfast, the chicken makes a contribution, but the pig makes a committment

espo
captain
Posts 996
05-20-03 08:05 PM - Post#106582    

Here, here Hike! Yeah Fergies always gonna be the man we owe it all to.

The amazing thing back then was that Fergie could jump on the ice any time play stopped and get in someone's face without any penalty unless they fought. I couldn't believe it the first time I saw it! Kurtenbach was real big on that too.

Imagine Bob Probert or Tony Twist being able to leave the bench during ANY break in the action to warn or fight somebody any time he felt the urge....without being penalized.

Therefore, there were less fights because you were accountable or your own actions.

Ever notice how serious those old brawls were? They would all hold up their sticks with complete intent to use them and maim if challenged. It was't bluffing, it was self-protection. The reality of those kinds of fights actually made for less fights but considerably more tension when they happened. When they went, they really went at it fast and furious and it ended faster too because the risk of real harm was much greater. It was like everyone carried a nuclear weapon. Even a little guy using a stick was very dangerous.
MarkT
captain
Posts 816
05-20-03 11:47 PM - Post#106610    

Sanderson was one of the big, bad, back-stabbing Bruins. When toughness really came into the league in 72, you saw how those guys weren't shit. Sanderson, Hodge, Dallas Smith, Awrey, Rick Smith, Bailey, McKenzie, Vadnais. They were all bad in the pre-3rd man in era when they could go 2 on 1 and 3 on 1 against guys. Put Orr as a fighter in that category as well. Sanderson didn't fight Hadfield in the 72 finals, he fought Gilbert and Rousseau. BOBBY ROUSSEAU! Please. What did he have, 50 PIMs in his career? Talk about going after non-fighters. Who did he ever beat? Tony Esposito? Ray MacKay? Please. You saw what Sanderson was made of when he couldn't even beat Bobby Clarke and the Flyers didn't even feel the need to jump in even though it was at the end of the period and the benches were out. I remember Ferguson beating him in a shit fight in game 7 of the 71 playoffs on CBS. As for him beating Kurtenbach, that I would have to see to believe. If he was tough, name one win he had as a Ranger, Blue, Canuck or even 2nd time Bruins. Entertaining book he wrote though.
Hike
Veteran
Posts 6090
05-21-03 05:26 AM - Post#106627    

Mark, who said he beat Kurtenbach? Kurtenbach bloodied him in Boston in 68 and Sanderson fought him to a draw in the 70 playoffs.

Was it the 70 playoffs that he beat Hadfield or maybe it was a regular season game in 72, but it sure as shit happened in one of them, and it was after Hadfield made a bunch of noise about getting even with Sanderson. I can tell you for sure that Hadfield fought Sanderson at least twice that I am aware of and he lost both of them.

I know you view all these guys as spot-pickers, but for a guy who considers himself a fan of 70's hockey, you forget to remember that intimidation was a part of the game back than. The Bruins introduced intimidation to the game and the Flyers perfected it.

As far as post 72 fighters go, none of the players that entered the league during the 60's could compete any longer as heavyweights. The only two that possibly could have were Ferguson and Kurtenbach, but Ferguson retired and Kurtenbach was a shell of his former self, which culminated in his one-punch KO loss at the hands of Dave Lewis in 73.
When you have bacon and eggs for breakfast, the chicken makes a contribution, but the pig makes a committment

espo
captain
Posts 996
05-21-03 09:56 AM - Post#106668    

That's funny MarkT. (Next you are going to say Phil Esposito was a better fighter?) Old wounds opening up again eh? It must have been tough times in NYC back then. Oh well, one man's sorrow was my extreme pleasure being that I was a huge Bruins fan then. I even liked the Turk better than Espo or Orr and agree with Fergie's comments that Sanderson greased the Bruin's engine.

Nobody's saying he was a Dan Maloney calibur fighter back then or even top 100 all time, but you'd have to be blind to say he couldn't fight and wasn't tough.

As was said already and obviously confirmed by your ire, Sanderson was a master shit disturber way ahead of his time who would do almost anything to win....and did. At least, unlike most disturbers today, he could take it as well as dish it out.

Not fair to bring up fights after the Bruins because we know he got severe colitis from the alcoholism. He star dimmed quicker than most because of his well documented self-abuse and none of his fights after he left the Bruins stand out to me although I know I saw some and he continued to play tough for pussy teams that could not be motivated by him to employ Bruin/FLyer wining tactics. BTW, that was one helluva Sunday puch Plager put on him as a Ranger and he took it like it didn't hurt when it should have ko-ed him. I did see him in a great fight against Sutherland of the LA Sharks in the WHA where he beat the crap out of him. Of course that was while he was still prime.

As for his flamboyance, you had to admit he was a blast to watch on and off ice and no one could exaggerate that part. Something hockey could always use.....more colorful characters.
corson27
all star
Posts 2046
corson27
05-22-03 04:38 AM - Post#106863    

A few comments here.

First of all, great posts by all of you guys. I have learned a lot of things about Derek Sanderson that I have never would have been privy to otherwise.

Espo, kind of off topic but I could never understand people that change who their favorite team is in hockey, especially when it comes to the original six teams. I was a Montreal Canadien fan when I was a kid, and I am to this day, even though the winning years have been a little lean lately. You said you used to be a Bruins fan but obviously, now you are a Rangers fan. Is this because Phil Esposito was traded from Boston to New York so you switched alligences? I like Shayne Corson more than anyone could probably like an individual player and he has played for a few teams other than the Habs but even when he was in Edmonton, St.Louis, etc., I always cheered for the Canadiens. I was just curious about this.

Another thing is, how the hell do all of you guys know about these fights from the sixties? Is it from books that you have read like Fergie's and Sanderson's or do you guys have footage from these years. If you have video, how did you come about getting it? I don't understand, unless there is a channel that televises old games.

The information about Sanderson is quite amazing. Like some of you have said, I only knew him as the brutal Boston Bruin homer/announcer saying shit like, "Miller just wants to play hockey", and after Corson just finishes beating the shit out of Bob Sweeney, "Bob just lost his balance".

He sounded like quite the character but that doesn't change my opinion of him. Sure he made some mistakes, we all do, but I don't feel sorry for a guy who made his own bed and had to sleep in it. Antics like Sanderson pulled off will eventually catch up to a guy sooner or later. And I can't believe he was a ladies man, because what I saw of him, he looked like 2000 miles of bad road. I am sure the booze had caught up to his appearance at this point but I still find it hard to fathom that he was a sex symbol.

I don't want to say I hate the man because hate is a strong word, but I passionately dislike him. Sure, I have to give him credit for being one of the first of the tough guy/shit disturber type players that have bred the tough style we have come to know and love from the NHL but his "out of this world" homerism is unforgivable. You have to remember, I am a die hard Montreal Canadiens fan and had to endure his calls on a lot of games and fights that I have watched. In fact, I don't think anybody other than a fan of the teams Sanderson played for can honestly say they like the guy from a hockey standpoint. I have never personally met the man and can only judge him by his color commentary days, which were dispicable. He may be a nice guy and a good family man and if I met him, I may actually like the guy but if I were to see him right now, I would have to hold back the urge to spit on him.
"...she'll give you every pennies worth, but it will cost you a dollar first." - "She's a Beauty" by The Tubes

Neely8
hall of famer
Posts 6299
Neely8
05-22-03 08:00 AM - Post#106880    

I'd like to see you spit on him, that would be interesting.
PuckRogue
moderator
Posts 31642
PuckRogue
05-22-03 09:18 AM - Post#106892    

I wouldn't need to see the spitting, just the "Dispicable Homer's" reaction...

Great info from everyone here. Wonderful reading.

Thanks!
-PR
Bee-dee Bee-dee Bee-dee

the hammer
superstar
Posts 3633
05-22-03 11:02 AM - Post#106921    

Corson, here's my answer to your question about my knowledge about the 1960's and early 70's fights. I've watched and followed hockey since 1969. I bought 100's of hockey magazines and still have my hockey news mags from 1970 to 1990. When i started following the Flyers in 1972 i'd go to the library and cut out any articles about hockey fights. In town there's a newsstand that carries newspapers from all over the world. When ever there was a major brawl i'd be in the next day to buy the papers, like the Philly- Toronto playoff brawl from 1976. Since i never threw out any of these and read them over once in awhile the fights and brawls stay fresh in my mind.
Irons
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Posts 3446
Irons
05-22-03 11:19 AM - Post#106926    

I know when he was with the Blazers he was always drinking up half the bar then sticking his MUCH lesser paid teammates with his bill. Great guy.

Miller29
veteran
Posts 284
Miller29
05-22-03 04:21 PM - Post#107037    

I heard just the opposite, he was very generous at the bar, and very generous with his drugs too.

I thought he was entertaining as an announcer, he always had me laughing. I liked his Uh O's and Hey Hey's. When he first started doing color Cusik and Shea would argue with him on his call of a fight, after a few games they realized there was no changing him and succumbed to his brilliance.
espo
captain
Posts 996
05-23-03 02:26 PM - Post#107241    

Corson27, FYI, I am not, nor ever had been a Rangers "fan". I was an LA Blades fan first (Ever heard of Willie O'Ree), then a LA Kings fan till Melrose was kicked out. However, I'm 50 years old so I followed the Big Bad Bruins for their style of hockey that was before the Broard Street Bullies were a gleem in Snyder's eye.

The Big Bad Bruins don't get the credit they deserve for bringing the rough brand of team play before most to a successful level. Everyone wore Bruin jerseys and no one had a Kings jersey. When I played night hockey at Laurel Plaza against the Stuntmen's Assoc. run by Ronnie Rondell, they all wore the Bruin jerseys, and acted like them...great time of my life. It got so brutal to play, with full on checking and fights, that the stuntmen had to stop eventually because they were getting too hurt to work.
All that happened because of the excitement the Bruins brought to LA hockey back then. Their games were the only King's sell out at first.
Ipsick
Member
Posts 20232
Ipsick
05-23-03 02:35 PM - Post#107249    

Espo, in the early 80's I wore a Bruins cap to a Dodger game and a lot of the concessionaires would come over to talk hockey...they loved the Bruins. They all talked about the "good old days" LOL.
http://www.flyfishthesurf.com/

espo
captain
Posts 996
05-23-03 08:12 PM - Post#107315    

IPSICK: It got much worse than I described. They were idols to me. We used to figure out which flight they would come in on (in those days, the airlines would actually tell you) and walk with them off the plane. I still have photos with most of them.

Espo, Cheevers, Orr, Pie, Chief, Cash, Hodge (big pussy)...were all cool, however, it was Sanderson who would always go out of his way to goof with to us and really gave us quality time. A genuine, no bull-shit guy. He was our all time favorite!

This is wierd to think back on, but I used to carve big B symbols in every college desk at college before it was known as graffitti...there must have been hundreds of B's by the time I graduated.

The Bruins were it...until Pulford finally turned the Kings around with Maloney's help. Then when they played, I had trouble rooting against one...so I went the Kings and except for the Melrose years, regretted it for the next 25 years of heartbreaks.
corson27
all star
Posts 2046
corson27
05-24-03 05:05 AM - Post#107356    

Hammer and Espo, thanks for the replies.

I wonder if Sanderson thinks he himself ever lost a fight in his mind in his NHL career? He can't be that stupid can he?
"...she'll give you every pennies worth, but it will cost you a dollar first." - "She's a Beauty" by The Tubes

Hike
Veteran
Posts 6090
05-24-03 07:27 AM - Post#107370    

Corson, to answer your question, because we're old, LOL.

I've been following this game since the early 60's and was born before Eisenhower was President. Hell, I can recall when Harry Howell was patrolling the blue line for the Rangers with Arnie Brown as his defensive partner. Used to go to the old Garden all the time so got to witness a couple of Kurtenbach/Ferguson fights, some Fleming/Ferguson fights. Also, couldn't wait for the weekly hockey rags to come out as they did a pretty good job of covering the games and the fights back than.
When you have bacon and eggs for breakfast, the chicken makes a contribution, but the pig makes a committment

the hammer
superstar
Posts 3633
05-24-03 12:21 PM - Post#107411    

Anybody remember Derek's talk show? I think it was weekly but i'm not sure. If i recall Neilson's song "Everybody's Talkin" was played at the beginning of each show.
karenf
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Posts 4963
karenf
05-24-03 12:43 PM - Post#107414    

This article appeared in the April 6, 1970, issue of Sports Illustrated. Thought some of you old timers might enjoy it. Talks a little bit about the Kurtenbach/Sanderson fight and also a Gordie Howe/Keith Magnusson fight.

As the week began, the loosest player in the National Hockey League's tightest playoff race ever was Derek Sanderson, 23, center of the Boston Bruins. He awoke in a mod, round bed undreamed of in his street-fighting, high school-dropout days, picked up a phone from the white sheepskin rug and dialed his answering service. Little Joe, as Sanderson is sometimes called, had received no messages in the night from his idol, Big Joe Namath. Sanderson ran a brush over his razor-cut hair, put on a pair of flowered bell-bottoms and a shirt the color of orange sherbet and walked outside to his gold 1970 Continental Mark 111. The plates read Bruins 16 "They're welded on," said the Bruins' No. 16. "They'd be stolen every day if they weren't."

Derek drove to practice at Harvard's Watson Rink. In the dressing room Coach Harry Sinden announced a change of travel plans for Wednesday's game in New York: the Bruins would fly out that night instead of the next morning because of the air controllers' slowdown. Sanderson was annoyed. "I had a date with Jackie tonight," he said. "No, with Susan; I forgot, Jackie was the backup."

In Chicago that morning the Black Hawks' rookie defenseman Keith Magnuson studied the bathroom mirror. He saw worry in the eyes looking back from his choir-boy face. He slicked down his Huck Finn mop of red hair and examined the bruise over his left eye. Keith Magnuson, 23, late of Denver University and wars with Michigan Tech and Cornell; overnight a man of heavy responsibility with a contender for the NHL championship. Boston a point ahead. Gotta beat Detroit next. Gotta stop Gordie Howe

Magnuson shook his roommate, Cliff Koroll, awake and in a while drove somberly to practice in his sporty white 1970 Olds. Coach Billy Reay was having travel troubles, too. The Hawks would fly to Detroit that night, not the next afternoon. A couple of players were caught with their topcoats at the cleaners Bobby Hull offered his to Gerry Pinder, who quickly discovered just how muscular the Golden Jet really is. The shoulders were down to here, the sleeves up to there. Bobby broke up. Magnuson managed a thin grin.

In New York, Sanderson checked in at the Bruins' hotel, then took a taxi to Bachelors III. Big Joe, former part owner, was not there. Sanderson had a fast meal and beat Sinden's 11:15 p.m. curfew. At noon the next day he was back at Bachelors III with Gary Doak, a Boston defenseman, and the brothers Orr, Bobby and 15-year-old Doug, who was on a school holiday and traveling with the Bruins as gatekeeper and alternate stick boy. They ate steaks and discussed the enemy. The Rangers can't afford to lose tonight," said Bobby. "If they do, they'll probably miss the playoffs."

"They'll be gone, Bobby," said Derek.

Boston had not defeated an East Division team on the road all season, but that didn't bother Derek. "When we go out and hit the other team early," he said, "we usually win. We haven't been doing that on the road. But wait and see, there will be a lot of fights tonight."

Sanderson went to Times Square to find the movie M*A*S*H, then to Madison Square Garden. During the pre-game warmup the New York crowd waved rubber chickens at Sanderson and the Bruins. Boston's Wayne Cashman grabbed one and brought it into the dressing room. Sanderson took it and hung it up in the center of the room. "We'll show 'em who's chicken." he snarled.

In the game's first minute Cashman charged a Ranger and was sent to the penalty box. Trying to play roughhouse themselves, the Rangers were hit with penalties. Boston promptly scored a pair of power-play goals. Later in the first period big Orland Kurtenbach gave Sanderson a solid elbow to the jaw in a scuffle behind the Boston goal. "He was out to get me," Derek said. "Just watch. We'll go at it before long."

Early in the second period Kurtenbach scored from close in to make it 2-1. "I should have been on the ice against his line," Sanderson said, "but I was having some trouble. I was back in the dressing room vomiting." Moments after that goal Sanderson and Kurtenbach had their fight. Derek, who was conceding two inches and 25 pounds did not win, but he probably deserved a draw. He skated to the penalty box with his arms raised high. "Look at him," Ranger Coach Emile Francis was heard to say. "I'd like to punch him in the nose."

"That was my peace sign," Sanderson said.

Seven policemen moved near the box to protect the man of peace from the fans who were waving the rubber chickens. Near the end of the period Boston was penalized again giving the Rangers an excellent opportunity to tie the game. Sanderson, hockey's best penalty killer, skated onto the ice. Soon the puck went to the Rangers' Rod Gilbert who lined up a slap shot. Sanderson recklessly skated in front of the puck crouching to block it. The puck crashed against his shin guard and rebounded toward the New York goal. Eddie Giacomin the Rangers' goaltender moved after the puck but realizing Sanderson would be there first skated back into his crease.

Sanderson coolly moved in on Giacomin. A goal now, he knew, would probably crush the Rangers not only in this game but for the playoffs as well. Sanderson deftly pulled Giacomin to his left and slid the puck between the goalie's legs. The Bruins preserved their 3-1 margin the rest of the game.

"So Chicago's playing the Red Wings," Sanderson said afterward. "Let 'em play. I wouldn't go to see the Hawks if they were playing next door. We're both hot. The first team that gets skeptical will lose. I don't talk losing. It's winning with me, all winning."

In Detroit, Keith Magnuson caught the Boston score on TV and went nervously to bed. He was still a touch jittery the next day, and shopping with Koroll didn't help. He had steak at 2 p.m. and tried to take a nap. Sleep would not come. At 5:30 he and the rest of the Hawks went by bus to Olympia Stadium.

The city of Detroit was caught up in a delirious case of playoff fever. Fans, starved for hockey as they used to know it in the glory days of the 1950's snapped up all the standing-room tickets by early afternoon and not even the oldest Howe-Lindsay-Abel worshippers could remember the last time that happened. As the game began traffic on Grand River Avenue was so jammed many fans missed the first 10 minutes.

Magnuson lost his jitters in a hurry, thanks to Gordie Howe. With a minute or so gone, Howe caught the rookie--and the referee--looking elsewhere and to the delight of the crowd jerked Magnuson's feet out from under him in front of the Chicago net. When he was only 10 Magnuson had sent away for an autographed picture of Howe, who obliged with, "Good luck and best wishes to my friend Keith." Nevertheless, in his first game at Olympia last November, Magnuson dropped his gloves to do battle with the man who never loses. Howe cuffed Magnuson's ears and turned away, muttering to Doug Jarrett, Keith's partner on defense, "He's a tough kid, but he'll learn."

Now Magnuson was playing spirited, flawless hockey, the kind that in just one season has made him the Hawks' chief fire-lighter. The teams wheeled through the first period without scoring, then the second. Chicago's rookie goalie Tony Esposito and Detroit's Roy Edwards were sensational. Deep into the third period the Hawks saw some daylight. Koroll put a nifty pass on Pit Martin's stick. Martin fired once, then gobbled up the rebound and flipped a backhand shot high into the net behind Edwards. Esposito made the 1-0 advantage stand up for his 14th shutout of the season--and that was a new NHL record.

When the buzzer finally sounded the goalie lunged after the puck but was overwhelmed by his teammates. They made sure he got it. "Usually I'm one of the first to congratulate Tony," Magnuson said, "but tonight I was one of the last. I was just limp. The pressure of that game was unbelievable. I kept seeing Howe tying us in the last 30 seconds, the way he beat us once earlier in the year. Pressure like this--I'm not used to it."

In the dressing room Esposito celebrated by nicking himself with a razor. Bobby Hull croaked, "When I was 21 it was a very good year...." He told Magnuson: "Maggy, this could be a very good year."

"This," said Derek Sanderson, "will be an ugly weekend." The prospect of back-to-back games with Detroit had etched a trace of skepticism on the non-skeptic. "They're the toughest team for us. The old men--Gordie Howe, Alex Delvecchio--get the job done. They're used to the pressure. They've played for first place and the cup before."

As Derek dressed for Saturday's matinee he did some self-psyching. "A hockey player must have three things planted in his head: hate, greed and jealousy," he declared. "He must hate the other guy, be greedy for the puck and he must be jealous when he loses. Hockey players without those traits don't survive too long around here."

In the uproarious Boston Garden there were more banners than usual, one of them hailing the officials as BUMS. BLIND. SICK. It was a reckless, high-scoring game and not one of Sanderson's better ones. Boston blew a 3-1 lead to the old smoothies, Howe and Delvecchio, and went behind 5-4 with seven minutes left.

Orr came to the rescue with less than four minutes remaining, scoring his 31st goal of the season and raising his league-leading point total to 112. The Bruins should have done better at home; still they were grateful for the 5-5 tie and the point that put them two up on Chicago in the standings.

As the Hawks flew into Toronto Friday, Magnuson was worried again, this time about the crowds of pals and relatives who always show up at the hotel in that hallowed hockey city to barber with the players. He had another worry, "You open the paper," Magnuson said, "and there the Leafs are in last place. It takes a lot to get up for them. But now's the time to make hay."

Haying was only so-so Saturday night in Maple Leaf Gardens as the Hawks and Leafs played a 1-1 tie. Toronto was loose, Chicago flat. Magnuson survived a heavy check by Bob Pulford that smashed his face against the boards. "Really, all that hurts is my lips," Keith said later.

"If anyone's got tough lips," said Koroll it's you."

The Bruins arrived in Detroit Saturday night as the Chicago game was ending. There was a rush to turn on television sets. "Chicago and Toronto a 1-1 final," Sanderson heard Eddie Westfall yell.

"I'm going to kiss the Toronto goalie," Sanderson announced. "We're still in first place, right? Anyway, I'd rather play on the road than in Boston. I go better when I get booed. I never have any problem busting people."

Derek busted four or five Red Wings Sunday afternoon in a game of furious action but hit the goalpost late in the third period with what might have been the winning shot. The final score: 2-2.

Back in Chicago for a return game Sunday night with the Leafs, Magnuson gave earnest thought to Billy Reay's stern warning not to take unnecessary penalties. "I get mad out there and I'm not afraid to fight anyone," he said. "But we've come too far for one individual to louse things up now." Louse them up he did not. Gerry Pinder scored goal No. 1 for Chicago and then little Tough Lips ignited a picture play that all but broke the Leafs' spirit. He caught the Leafs napping by threading a perfect pass out to Jim Pappin at the Chicago blue line, who whipped it to Pinder busting into the Toronto end, who scored while falling down. Bobby Hull added two pretty goals and Tony Esposito had his 15th shutout.

And so it was that the desperate week ended in deadlock, with a nervous redhead and a swinging dude teed a mile high for the season's last three games.
the hammer
superstar
Posts 3633
05-24-03 12:54 PM - Post#107419    

Nice post Karen! I have the same SI mag. I'm sure you know how Dave Schultz got his nickname the "Hammer". He got it when he broke Magnuson's jaw in Dave's rookie season.
Posux
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Posux
05-24-03 02:44 PM - Post#107430    

Great read....thanks..

espo
captain
Posts 996
05-25-03 12:00 PM - Post#107498    

Nice Karen, here's more...

From the book 'Hockey's Toughest 10":

Brad Park said; "What bothers me most about Sanderson is that at any given time on the ice, even he has no idea what he's going to do and he has no concept of hockey ethics. For example, once when Derek was trippd and heading full on towards a collision with the boards, I put my gloves up to stop him from getting hurt. So what does he do when he gets up? Thank me? Never! Instead he puts his stick between my skates and dumps me flat on my head!
espo
captain
Posts 996
05-27-03 09:33 PM - Post#107878    

I just received the old Life Magazine I ordered that had the great, several pages long layout on Sanderson. It's even better than I remembered. You all gotta see this!

I realized that I was looking at a real dead-end kid made good. It was a real life "trading places" that made you see that dreams do come true. Who knew the bottom was about to drop out on the guy?

Pictures tending bar with a stoogie hanging out of his mouth, fights, wearing a cop hat and laying in his circular bed with a hot babe.

The guy was one of sports best known atheletes of his time. Amazing in that he played on the same team with Phil Esposito and Bobby Orr.... in their primes, but he was the one you watched most.

Most of you probably don't even know what Life Magazine was because it stopped published before many of you were born. However, in it's era, you had to really be somebody big & famous to get the main spread inside. I mean J. Edgar Hoover (who at that time, was perhaps arguably more powerful than most Presidents) was on the cover, but Sanderson got more ink inside.

I'm going to post it here when I get some quality free time.

Fotiu
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Posts 15686
Fotiu
05-27-03 10:03 PM - Post#107887    

There is a photograph of me in the February 1984 issue of Life (yes, I WAS that big and famous!)

The cover story that month was on the history of cocaine (LOL, that's what's called foreshadowing kids!)
Is Roy Innis gonna have to choke a bitch?!

Magnusson10
veteran
Posts 368
05-28-03 11:05 PM - Post#108030    

Espo--- One comment finally said, And I agree with you, AND IT"s A WHOPPER.... when the Bruins were on TV or you were watching them Live..Sanderson was the most electric and exciting player. And he was playing with arguable, one of the best 3 players in hockey history.

His toughness (or dirtiness) made me SOOO pissed off, but he could back it up... more so than most Bruins, in my book. They were definetly the king of 3rd and 4th man in fights, but I remember Derek fighting clean one on one's more than the others.

I saw the TV show, where he was on Namath's show in NY, chain smoking and drinking booze right on the show,, and he was clearly a wild man. But what I couldn't beleive was how small he looked. He always looked big enough and very strong on the ice, but on the show, next to Joe Willie, he looked real small. But Hockey players were not all that big back in the day. Tough son of a guns though.
espo
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Posts 996
05-30-03 11:04 PM - Post#108354    

....
Boulton
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Posts 3000
05-30-03 11:13 PM - Post#108355    

ESPO - Nice job.
"Go fuck yourself, Mr. Cheney! Go fuck yourself, you asshole!" Emergency Room Physican Dr. Ben Marble

Magnusson10
veteran
Posts 368
05-31-03 07:34 AM - Post#108362    

Hockey could really use a guy like that right now. I person who can bring attention to the sport and epitomize the traditional ,rough, physical, slightly crazy but highly passionate player.
Posux
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Posux
05-31-03 03:52 PM - Post#108402    

Espo: Great pics...

the hammer
superstar
Posts 3633
06-01-03 05:09 PM - Post#108438    

In March of 1978 Detroit Redwing's GM Ted Lindsey gave Derek a 10-day trail period to get in shape to join the Red Wings to see if could still cut it. Coach of Detroit at the time Bobby Kromm said Sanderson had a 5 percent chance of making it. Detoit players were upset at the time. "He's gonna take somebody's place who has been with us all season and worked hard to bring us where we are - - we don't need him" said one player. Derek said he is almost broke- says he only has $6000 left, but he's on the wagon and trying to turn it around. He says he spent $35,000 on a trip to Hawaii. "Sick that's how i feel about going thru all my money" said Sanderson, "but nobody could have stopped me from spending it". "American Express Gold- that was my favorite color" "It started when i jumped leagues and got all that money". "I couldn't handle it" "I would not do it again- i should have stayed in the NHL". As far as i remember he never played for Detroit. Anybody else recall this.
espo
captain
Posts 996
06-05-03 09:12 PM - Post#109233    

I'm reading an excellent book by Gerry Cheevers called "Goaltender". This should be required readig in Hockey 101. Don't let the title fool you. It's really a day by day diary of the Bruins whole 70-71 season. Naturally, he has lots to say about fighting in general and the Bruin players. Derek Sanderson comes up quite frequently!

Some quotes:
"the best penalty killer in the game.... in the Hawks playoffs games....Derek won 32 successive faceoffs."

"...what a knock-out his girlfriend Judy is..."

"we hear Derek's going to be on the cover of LIFE.."

"...when the referee blew his whistle Tony (Esposito) and I had great seats for two fights and one hockey game. Players get pretty high for a game like this one and fights are inevitable."

"Derek and Keith Magnuson are just natural enemies. Young Magnuson, with the red hair and low boiling point, is the same sort of determined competitor Derek is. They have to clash sooner or later, after they've been digging in the corners a few times. Rick Smith got into a battle with a new Chicago fella, named Mahoney or Maloney, and they put on a pretty decent fight too. Afterwards, like always, they say the win them and we say we win them."

"I'll tell you, Perreault's the best young hockey player I've seen come into the league since Bobby Orr and maybe, Sanderson."

"In Philly...Derek was sitting out a penalty when it all started, and the rest of our guys left our bench to give him a hand. A fan sitting behind the bench kept riding Derek and when Turk turned around to stare at him, this guy spit on Derek. So the Turk lept up and went after him, and the other guys went along....what kind of club would we be if we saw one of our players disappear into the crowd, on the road, and we didn't make a move to help? I wonder if Clarence Campbell knew he'd been spit on...?

..."Campbell calls fights 'escape valves for the players', and on the other hand lays down fines when players leave the benches. Hell, the league LOVES FIGHTS; it knows that fights sell tickets....so why pay lip service to league controls? The Buffalo guys left their bench too. Were we supposed to watch?"

Cheevers talks about other brawls too, including the famous Montreal brawl where Derek wound up standing in the Montreal bench wearing a policeman's cap.

Great, great read. Especially for Bruins fans...that is, up until game 7 of the Playoff when a new guy named Dryden shut them down. Even then Derek was competing to the end..."and so with the clock ticking down, with ten minutes left in the draining frustration, Derek piles into John Ferguson, swinging and grunting, hoping his example will start a fire to bring us back. But it is too late."
espo
captain
Posts 996
06-06-03 10:47 AM - Post#109310    

More from Cheevers:

"LIFE's running a six-page spread on Derek, one of them is a full colr shot of him and his chick Judy on their groovy round bed".

"Derek is crestfallen. He's just heard that LIFE MAGAZINE has wavered in it's selection of next week's cover. Instead of Derek Sanderson, the mustachioed Bruin, the cover will belong to J. Edgar Hoover."

"All the magazines, in fact, are discovering the Bruins just now, even the highbrows....The NEW YORKER, ATLANTIC, NEWSWEEK...."

" 'The guys at LIFE told me that unless the war in Vietnam ended next week, I was on', old Turk muttered bleakly."

"It's the Turks philosophy that a deal is a deal. He cites his own action in pulling out of Bachlors III. He'd been a partner with Joe Namath in this Boston bar. When I bought into a couple of little bars...I tried to tell Joe that this wasn't a conflict of interest...that the people who come to Bachlors are
not the ones who come into those little joints where the beer's 60 cents. When I couldn't convince him, I got out. If they don't want my friends, they don't want me either. There's no hard feelings between Namath and me. He has his opinions, I have mine."
espo
captain
Posts 996
06-09-03 11:01 AM - Post#109577    

A Hans Brinker he is not
Derek Sanderson is not the first hockey player to spend the afternoon before a game with a woman or squabble with league management or wear a mustache and long hair, or make headlines by fighting with fans. But he is the first to do it all and shout out the good news. As a result, the 24-year-old center for the Boston Bruins has become hockey's most colorful, most booed and most controversial player. Sanderson has his own weekly TV shoe, a plush bachelor apartment, at least one strikingly beautiful girlfrien, an Income approching $100,000 and an autobiography entitled I've Got To Be Me. "The square hockey world could use a change," says Derek, whose team this week begins its defense of the Stanley Cup. "and I'm the guy to change it."
espo
captain
Posts 996
06-09-03 11:03 AM - Post#109578    

The fans boo him everywhere - and he loves it
by BILL BRUNS

Boston's usually low-keyed coach stood in the lobby of New York's Statler-Hilton several hours before his Bruins would meet the Rangers in a midseason game. Suddenly he slammed his hand across the paper he was reading. "Christ almighty!" he snapped. "Listen to what Sanderson's told this reporter: 'We can beat the Rangers any time we want.'" The quote was vintage Derek Sanderson, brassy and self-confident, but the kind which usually inspires opponents. "When is he going to learn to keep his mouth shut?" Johnson said disgustedly. "He's just hurting his teammates."
Sanderson, meanwhile, was in room 827A trying to focus on the new day. His hair was disheveled, his eyes red and swollen. "I'm so damn sleepy," he moaned. "Why can't ice hockey games get rained out?"
He struggled out of bed and into the clothes he had draped over a chair the night before. Then he went into the bathroom and stared into the mirror. "I'm losing weight again," he announced. "How can I be a 'policeman' at 165 pounds? But I'm off the violence kick. No more fights."
Derek Sanderson was trying on another image. He likes to project many images--the fighter, the man of peace, the lover, the pure hockey player, the thinker--but has a hard time remembering which one he is into at any given moment. There is a constant, however. "The thing to remember about Derek," says Bob Woolf, the prominent sports attorney who handles Sanderson's affairs, "is that he's always looking for ways to shock people. His whole life is built that way. He's dying to be important."
In his own way, Sanderson agrees. "I've always had things to say, but people wouln't listen to me. They only listen if you're rich or you're famous. I was a 10th-grade dropout from Niagara Falls, so there's no way I was going to be rich.


espo
captain
Posts 996
06-09-03 03:55 PM - Post#109659    

I know I'm dragging this thread out....tough shit. Here's more:

'I'm getting tired of being a male sex symbol'
It had to be hockey, and the quickest way was to be controversial."
Because of his long hair and mustache, the fights he gets into, the tough way he plays hockey and the way he flouts the accepted moral codes, Derek has acquired more "anti-fans" than any athlete in the country. Every time he skates on the ice, the fans are there with their banners--"kill Derek," "Skin the Hairy Fairy"--and their boos. But as the devilish young tough, he helps make the Bruins the most entertaining show in the National Hockey League.
Sanderson's search for an image has obviously been profitable for him but the result, Derek laments, is that "people don't know the real Derek Sanderson. They think because I'm flaky, I'm just a dumb freak."
Unquestionably he is often coarse and irritating, but he is also refreshingly irreverent and outspoken in a tradition-bound sport that lacks colorful personalities. And despite his talk about turning away his "cheap ego trip," Derek never passes up the opportunity to use his fists on opponents, to shine as hockey's sexiest symbol and to provoke the hockey establishment.
On the Bruin's bus after a game in Toronto, Derek was talking across the aisle with General Manager Milt Schmidt. The subject was the recent incident in Boston when Derek had taken a Minnesota player out of action by picking up his loose stick and dropping it into the crowd. League President Clarence Campbell had requested a full report.
"If Cambell fines me I'm going to take him to court," Derek told Schmidt. "I wasn't penalized, no one was hurt."
"Do whatever you want," Schmidt said.
"Good! As long as I have your sanction, I'll take him to court."
"No!" Schmidt said angrily. "You don't have my sanction. I never said that."
"Well," said Derek, "I'm still going to take him to court. We need to set a precedent." He twitched his mustache in amusement. "Besides, I'd get a lot of publicity."
Dererk has been his own best press agent ever since he was a yougster. "I told everyone I was great when I was a Pee Wee player," Derek says, "even though nobody else thought so." After a brawling junior career--through which his father saved the stitches from Derek's fights in a jar at home--Sanderson joined the Bruins in 1967 wearing short-cropped hair and a wash-and-wear blue suit. He played hard, fought often, said little--and won Rookie of the Year honors.
He reported to training camp his second year sporting long hair, sideburns, turtle-neck shirts and bell-bottoms and boasting of his new life-style. "Reporters would ask me how many suits I owned and I'd say '47 suits and 60 pairs of shoes and boots,'" he recalls. "Actually I only had two pairs of shoes and a couple of suits. But I lied so often I began to believe it."
One advantage of the bad-guy image is that Derek can act however he wants: "Derek Sanderson, the bastard, can afford to push through crowds and not give autographs. I can be loud and obnoxious. People expect that from me. Sometimes I just want to aggravate people. If I'm not feeling right I'll say things just to shock people."
"one thing he lacks," says Woolf, "is a sense of loyalty to anyone. He uses people and will take advantage of anyone. Which is a shame, because on the ice he's a completely unselfish player. It's like two different people." Bobby Orr, the Bruins' brilliant young defenseman who has a contrasting clean-cut image, enjoys Derek's irreverency and rough-edged humor but tries to tutor him in acquiring a few social graces. This slightly annoys Sanderson: "Bobyb's always trying to get me to say 'Please' and 'Thank you' when I bum cigarettes."
The most obvious thing about Sanderson's mouth is that he really has no control over it. Naturally, therefore, everyone expected there would be trouble this year between him and Coach Tom Johnson, who replaced Harry Sinden last summer. "The problem with Johnson," Derek said one day early in the season, "is that he thinks just like that bow tie he wears."
The tension between Sanderson and Johnson finally came boiling into the open after a Bruins win in Philadelphia last November. Derek sat at his locker with sweat dripping down his face, still wearing his uniform, while Johnson stood a few feet away talking to a reporter. When Sanderson heard Clarence Campbell's name mentioned, a conditioned reflex took over.
"Campbell's a stuffed shirt," he broke in.
"Can I quote you on that?" he asked.
"Hell yes, I've said it before."
Johnson turned to Sanderson and shouted, "Why don't you keep your mouth shut and quit looking for the headlines!"
"I'll say whatever I want," Sanderson snapped back. "I was just telling the truth and you know it."
"We've had enough of your popping off. You don't even know Campbell."
"I know all about him. He's a stuffed shirt. He needs to loosen up."
"He's the president of the league and you treat him with respect."
"He's still a bum."
Johnson stalked away, and the locker room was suddenly subdued. Sanderson slumped back against his locker.
"Damn-I was in a good mood, I make a wisecrack and look what happens. It's like slandering the prison warden."
"See, Derek," said veteran Eddie Westfall, who was dressing alongside Sanderson. "Live I've been telling you since training camp--you pop off and then you have to pull yourself out of the hole."
"I've got to say what I believe."
"I know," said Westfall, "but not when the press is around. You only hurt yourself. And what about the rest of us? We have to live with your quotes. We go up together and down together. It's got to be that way."
"It takes maturity and self-control, Eddie. I don't have that yet."

Johnson has avoided any further confrontations with Sanderson. Derek, meanwhile, talks up his "new" image, but lives his old one. "I'm getting tired of the sex symbol bit," he said during a trip to New York. "How do people know if I'm a sex symbol? I may be a bad lover for all they know."
Then he sauntered cockily out of the hotel and hailed a cab. "I'll see you at Bachelors III," he said. "A friend of mine is setting me up with this groovy chick."


the hammer
superstar
Posts 3633
06-09-03 07:36 PM - Post#109677    

Nice espo, keep'em coming. I can never hear enough about Derek. Wish there were some current players that had the brass balls he had to speak what was on their mind. Just bought a Canadian magazine Macleans from 1972 that has Derek on the cover with a top hat on. The story is titled "Is Derek Sanderson Putting Us On ?"
espo
captain
Posts 996
06-09-03 07:59 PM - Post#109681    

Cool. Post it.
the hammer
superstar
Posts 3633
06-14-03 11:32 AM - Post#110487    

This story in Macleans is written by a novelist not a sports writer so it's kinda differant than your usual story. He states that in a recent game against New York Rangers, Sanderson scored one goal and played his usual serious penality-killing,forechecking, unselfish-passing three periods. When he stepped out on the ice for the first time the fans boo, the Madison Square Garden balconies are covered in banners. Not one mentions Phil Esposito who leads the NHL in scoring. The only time Bobby Orr's name appears is on a sign above an effigy of Derek which says: WANTED DEAD ORR ALIVE NUMBER 16! In the game he doesn't get one penality,wins face-offs fair + square but as he skates off the ice a Ranger fan hollers: "What's with ya Sanderson,ya lousy animal"!
After lunch,Sanderson and i walk through the Colonnade on Toronto's Bloor Street. "Hey you know any good broads in Toronto"? swinger Derek asks me. Several pretty girls pass by, Sanderson smiles,bows,makes a sad try at coming up with girl-boy chat. The girls ignore him and move right along. "Everybody thinks i'm nothing but women" Sanderson says "Finding nice broads ain't that easy"
A week or so later as we're driving past Bachelor's III ib Boston (which Sanderson was briefly connected with when Joe Namath hadn't given it up) he observes sourly: "I spoke to Namath maybe 30 minutes in my whole life. In New York City. He says to me, "Hey man know where i can find some girls"? Maybe he was putting me on". It's more likely that namath was putting Sanderson off. Imagine how many times guys have asked Namath "Hey where are the broads".
One afternoon two kids sneak into an area where the Bruins are eating. Orr isn't around but almost all the other Bruins are there. "Hey a kid says to Esposito, which one's Derek Sanderson?" Phil shrugs and points, the other players glare, the kid passes almost the entire roster by, gets Sanderson's autograph for himself and his buddy,squels with delight and leaves. It's almost like that everywhere else. First Orr, then Sanderson plus Esposito and Mckenzie then the undifferentiated rest. The players glare because though nobody thinks himself as good a player as Bobby Orr, or as good a scorer as Esposito, or as rough a scrapper as McKenzie or Green, everyone almost to a man thinks of himself as at least Sanderson's hockey equal if not his superior.Yet there's Sanderson talking about a dozen pairs of golf slacks he just bought for 35.00 each! In every city there's Derek's unsmiling photo and the WHA tale of 2 1/2 million bucks. I sit at a table with a couple of players: "I don't want to talk about Derek" a Bruin says quickly. When another player joins the table and is told I'm doing a piece on Sanderson, his immediate response ie "Well that won't take long will it?" Even Tom Johnson Sanderson's coach can't hide his feeling: "Not another thing about sanderson?" he says "Why can't people try something hard for a change?"

I guess even his own teammates didn't care for him after he returned from the WHA!
slamb-d
all star
Posts 2461
slamb-d
06-15-03 03:19 AM - Post#110548    

Derek Sanderson used to rival Bobby Orr for headliner status. I remember watching HNIC sometime around the early 70s, (probably '70 or '71) and there was Turk, doing a 1st period interview, standing there sans jersey, wearing his shoulder pads, and with a beer in one hand and a smoke in the other. Back then, Sanderson was every mother
"Let's get out of this shit hole."
Phil Esposito after Game 3 of the 1972 series in Winnipeg.

espo
captain
Posts 996
06-15-03 09:36 AM - Post#110558    

Derek's life could be a great movie. They wouldn't have to exaggerate anything. It would be called "Bowery Boy Make's Good, Then Fuck's Up and Loses Everything". James Cagney would have been perfect for the lead role. Pat O'brien would have played Phil Esposito as the guy who couldn't keep Sanderson on the straight and narrow and had no choice but to wash his hands of him...for the good of the kids.
the hammer
superstar
Posts 3633
06-18-03 09:18 PM - Post#111181    

Hey espo, you'll love these quotes from the Turk, taken from an old hockey mag. It's about how Derek had a great year with St Louis and how he's cleaned up his act but given the proper conditions he'll deliver a deluge of old Derekisms-such as the following:
On St Louis- "St Louis? Man there's no TV or radio people in St Louis. There's no writers in St Louis. Of course you haven't heard anything about me. St Louis? Geez you can't even buy a beer in St Louis on Sunday. If i were a Baptist, i'd be doing fine.
On Leaving The Rangers- "Cohen(MSG president Alan Cohen) and Burke(Garden executive Michael Burke) told Ranger president William Jennings i had to go. And when they told Jennings, he reacted like the basic puppet he is. He told Ranger coach Ron Stewart we have 5 centers and one of us had to go. Well Stewart hated me, and Jennings knew that. Stewart picked me."
On Jumping To The WHA- "That's my one regret,leaving Boston,jumping leagues. If i had it to do over again, I wouldn't have gone. I wish i could have played my entire career in Boston. I never would have left it i knew what was going to happen.
On Big Money- All that money caused me more harm than good. It's tough to handle it if you've never had it before. Hey, it's all a head-trip. I was way over paid. I can't play up to that salary level. I don't think any athlete can. No athlete's worth that kind of money. Dr. J, Bobby Orr maybe butthey don't constantly put people in the building. Maybe a 1000 or 2000 for a game here and there but no way over the course of 80 games.
Man is this guy quotable or what! Wish there were some players like him around today!
espo
captain
Posts 996
06-19-03 12:03 AM - Post#111190    

Good quotes.

I'm now reading a book called Hockey Night in Moscow about the incredible '72 series between the NHL and Soviet Union. Man, that was drama!

Anyway, the Russians knew all about Derek Sanderson and he scared them because they honestly believed his quotes about trying to kill people literally.

They were glad him and Hull were not allowed to play in that series because they had jumped leagues by then. Experts said Sanderson could have nullified the Soviet face of expert who almost never lost and draw.

There's some other Sanderson related quotes I'll post from there too.
the hammer
superstar
Posts 3633
06-22-03 08:09 PM - Post#111766    

Espo, i just bought a 2 tape set of the Boston Bruins 1969-70 season. It shows 5-8 minute hightlights of every game plus the playoffs. So far i've only watched 1/2 hour of it but it shows Derek fighting somebody named Mckay of Chicago. Well the cameras actually show the refs breaking up the fight, it happened as the action was at the other end of the ice, but Sanderson has Mckay's jersey in his hands and while he being led to the penalty box he tosses Mckay's jersey into the crowd! I completely forgot about this incedent! I can't remember anyone ever doing that. Can't wait to watch the rest of the tapes as the guy i bought it from said that there's alot of Orr + Sanderson fights on them. I also have a two tape set of the 1971-72 season and i'm sure there's some Sanderson fights on them.
Neely8
hall of famer
Posts 6299
Neely8
09-19-03 06:04 AM - Post#131876    

Bumping to save.
MarkT
captain
Posts 816
09-19-03 11:26 AM - Post#131962    

Firstly, I was never a Rangers fan, even though I'm from New York. I rooted for the Black Hawks prior to the Islanders joining the league.

Secondly, in answer to the guy who wanted to know how we know this stuff, believe it or not there are some people still alive who were born before 1980. Not many but some. And some of us actually watched hockey not just videotapes but we watched the games (which used to be watchable) at the time they were played. I became a hockey fan thanks to the 1970 Rangers-Bruins series. I don't remember a lot of specifics about the series other than that the Bruins hit everything that moved until Kurtenbach's line came on the ice and it became a finesse game. Strange how that happened.

As to why I like fights but hated the Bruins and Flyers, its real simple. I don't like back-stabbing bullies. I don't like jumpers and I don't like chickenshits like Ace Bailey, Don Saleski, etc.
the hammer
superstar
Posts 3633
11-22-03 06:33 PM - Post#161807    

Just picked up a Bruins book from 1972 titled We Love You Bruins by John Devaney. Very hard to find book with some great color photos and of course some more wonderful quotes from the Turk.

"I know i'm colorful" The Turk was saying. He was talking to a writer. The Turk lit a cigarette and leaned back. "Orr has got the overall talent. Esposito has got the overall points. Thew field left for me is color."

On being a dirty player-- "Sure i'm a dirty player" he said, a glint in his eyes. "I like playing dirty. Anyway that's how the game should be played. I like fighting. So what if i lose a couple of teeth, I'm gonna lose them sooner or later. It doesn't bother me. It's only pain. It doesn't hurt for long.

"I hate to lose whether it's playing gin or shooting pool. Losers, they date college girls. The winners date Playboy bunnies. That's why i hate those guys out on the ice who are in different uniforms. They're out there to make me a loser. I hate'em, really hate'em." Derek wanted to title his autobiography, I'll Smash You In The Face.

Man why can't there just one player in the league with half his charisma, then it won't be such a fuckin boring game!
the hammer
superstar
Posts 3633
01-15-10 09:57 PM - Post#1154245    

Here's an autographed picture I got signed by Sanderson when I met him at a card show a few years ago. He's still a card.



cashman rulz
legend
Posts 12251
cashman rulz
01-16-10 02:46 AM - Post#1154319    

God bless the turk and thanks for the thread hammer!If it wasn't for orr i think derek wouldn't be on this earth anymore.Got to see him at the winter classic zone the morning of the game,what a great centerman he was.

the hammer
superstar
Posts 3633
09-28-11 11:06 PM - Post#1351335    

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